= = Aleksandar Zecevic · Courses and Class Materials

Professor of Electrical Engineering · Associate Dean for Graduate Studies · EC 223 · ☎ (408) 554-2394 · azecevic@scu.edu

Aleksandar Zecevic

Courses and Class Materials

I teach a number of undergraduate and graduate classes, mainly in the areas of circuits and control. Syllabi and other course materials are available below.

  • ELEN 50 · Electric Circuits I

    Physical basis and mathematical models of circuit components and energy sources. Circuit theorems and methods of analysis applied to DC and AC circuits. Laboratory. (Undergraduate core course.) Co-requisite: PHYS 33. (4 units)

  • ELEN 100 · Electric Circuits II

    Continuation of ELEN 50. Sinusoidal steady state and phasors, transformers, resonance, Laplace analysis, transfer functions. Frequency response analysis. Bode diagrams. Switching circuits. Laboratory. Prerequisite: either ELEN 50 or PHYS 70. Co-requisite: AMTH 106. (4 units)

  • ELEN 112 · Modern Network Synthesis and Design

    Approximation and synthesis of active networks. Filter design using positive and negative feedback biquads. Sensitivity analysis. Fundamentals of passive network synthesis. Design project. Prerequisite: ELEN 110. (4 units)

  • ELEN 118 · Fundamentals of Computer-Aided Circuit Simulation

    Introduction to algorithms and principles used in circuit simulation packages (such as SPICE). Formulation of equations for linear and nonlinear circuits. Detailed study of the three different types of circuit analysis (AC, DC, and transient). Discussion of computational aspects, including sparse matrices, Newton’s method, numerical integration and parallel computing. Applications to electronic circuits, active filters, and CMOS digital circuits. The course includes a number of design projects in which simulation software is written in MATLAB and verified using SPICE. Also listed as ELEN 219. Prerequisites: ELEN 21, 100, and 115. (4 units)

  • ELEN 160 · Chaos Theory, Metamathematics and the Limits of Knowledge: A Scientific Perspective on Religion

    Limitations of science are examined in the framework of nonlinear system theory and metamathematics. Strange attractors, bifurcations and chaos are studied in some detail. Additional topics include an introduction to formal systems and an overview of Godel’s theorems. The mathematical background developed in the course is used as a basis for exploring the relationship between science, aesthetics, and religion. Particular emphasis is placed on the rationality of faith. Also listed as ELEN 217. Prerequisites: AMTH 106 (or an equivalent course in differential equations), and a basic familiarity with MATLAB. (4 units)

  • ELEN 211 · Modern Network Analysis I

    Graph theory and its applications to network matrix equations. Network component magnitude and frequency scaling. Network topology, graph theory, graph matrices, oriented and nonoriented graphs. Fundamental network laws. Topologically dependent matrix equations. Circuit simulation. N Planar and dual graphs. Nondegenerate network state equations. Prerequisites: AMTH 246 and knowledge of Laplace transforms. (2 units)

  • ELEN 236 · Linear Control Systems

    Concept of state-space descriptions of dynamic systems. Relations to frequency domain descriptions. State-space realizations and canonical forms. Stability. Controllability and observability. Discrete time systems. Prerequisite: ELEN 210 or its undergraduate equivalent of ELEN 110. (2 units)

  • ENGR 343 · Science, Religion and the Limits of Knowledge

    The limits of scientific knowledge are examined in the framework of nonlinear system theory, metamathematics and modern physics. The technical background developed in the course is used as a basis for exploring the relationship between science, aesthetics, and religion. Particular emphasis is placed on the rationality of faith, and on controversial questions where the views of scientists and theologians appear to conflict. Prerequisite: Basic familiarity with differential equations. (2 units)

  • ENGR 143H · Science, Religion and the Limits of Knowledge

    The limits of scientific knowledge are examined in the framework of nonlinear system theory, metamathematics and modern physics. The technical background developed in the course is used as a basis for exploring the relationship between science, aesthetics, and religion. Particular emphasis is placed on the rationality of faith, and on controversial questions where the views of scientists and theologians appear to conflict. Prerequisites: MATH 12 or MATH 31. Honors students or permission of Instructor. (4 units)