COEN 234 – Network Management

 

 

 

 

  Dr. Alexander Clemm

Please prefix messages to me regarding this course with “COEN 234” in the subject line to ensure they catch my immediate attention.  Thank you!

 

Updates and announcements on the course are also on Twitter: #coen234

 

COEN 234 takes place on Wednesdays, 7:10-9:00 pm, in Engineering 107 

 

 

 

Announcements (updated 3/15):

·       Results of Final have been posted below

·       Grades will be posted some time next week

·       Good luck for your future studies!

 

Quiz and Final results

 

Quiz 1 (2/1)

Quiz 2 (2/15)

Quiz (3/8)

Final

Last 3 ID digits

max 20 (+3)

max 20 (+2)

max 20 (+4)

max 94

897

13

12

15

36

104

22

21

18

90

182

15 1/2

14

16

74

348

15 1/2

19

13

74

160

16

17

20

55

297

21

19

23

85

362

11

20

23

77

860

18

20

17

80

161

16

19

19

72

947

19

14

16

71

 

Syllabus

 

COEN 234 – Network Management

 

Course Description: This course covers the technological foundations of network management used to operate large-scale networks and services. Management functions and management architectures, management building blocks (information models, management communication patterns, protocols), and selected issues of management in practice (service-level management).

 

Prerequisite: COEN 233 or equivalent.

 

Course Objectives: This course introduces the student into the principles and concepts of management technology with an emphasis on the “why”, not just the “how”.  The course will start out with presenting the “big picture”.  This includes an overview of business drivers and context in which network management technology is applied, as well as general management paradigms including management architectures, management functions, and foundational management algorithms.  As the course progresses, we will dive into more technical details such as management protocols, interfaces, and data models, showing how the general concepts are reflected in current management technology and how that technology can be applied to solve real business problems.  We will also touch on the related subject on SDN (Software Defined Networking) and explain how management concepts apply there.

 

Expected Learning Outcomes: By the end of class, the students will be able to:

  • Describe the tasks that are involved in operating a network
  • Understand the technical and non-technical drivers behind network management
  • Divide the overall problem space of network management into sets of smaller and more tangible sub-problems
  • Understand the fundamentals of management information models and definition languages: SMIv2, YANG
  • Describe the most common management interfaces and protocols: SNMP, CLI, syslog, Netflow/IPFIX, Netconf/Restconf
  • Understand the design goals behind those protocols, the tradeoffs which they entail, and why those tradeoffs were made
  • Approach practical management problems, such as Service Level Management, using those foundational concepts

 

The following topics will be covered:

  • Problem definition and overview - What is network management, network management business drivers, examples of management tools
  • Basic management concepts and management architectures - agent/manager paradigm, management networks, TMN reference architecture, Software Defined Networking (SDN)
  • Management functions and foundational management algorithms – Fault (monitoring, diagnostics, event correlation), Configuration (provisioning, orchestration), Accounting (metering and billing), Performance (service assurance), Security
  • Management information fundamentals – modeling of management information, Internet management model (MIBs/SMIv2, YANG)
  • Management communication fundamentals - management protocol architecture, basic management and control patterns

 

 

Reading

Textbook: A. Clemm, “Network Management Fundamentals”, Cisco Press, ISBN-13 978-1-58720-137-0

 

The book covers a good portion (roughly 2/3) of the material that will be covered in the course.  I recommend obtaining a copy and after each class reading the corresponding chapter(s).  They will reinforce what was discussed in class.  There are questions at the end of each chapter; try to answer them as an additional checkpoint as to whether you understood the material.  You should be able to borrow a copy from the library 

 

The best sources for newer developments are journals and conferences, for example: 

·         IEEE Transactions on Network and Service Management. IEEE Communications Society, http://www.comsoc.org/tnsm/.

·         IEEE/IFIP Network Operations and Management Symposium, http://www.ieee-noms.org/

·         IEEE International Conference on Network Softwarization (NETSOFT), http://sites.ieee.org/netsoft/

·         IEEE/IFIP International Symposium on Integrated Network Management, http://www.ieee-im.org/

 

The best sources for the latest network management standards, such as IPFIX, YANG, or Netconf, are the standards organizations’ Web sites.  Of specific importance for this course are the standards of the IETF, http://www.ietf.org/.